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Mike Cook

Why TuneIn Chose Sumo Logic For Machine Data Analytics

09.15.2014 | Posted by Mike Cook

The following is a guest post from Mike Cook, Director of Technical Operations at TuneIn.

Introduction

TuneIn is a rapidly growing service that allows consumers to listen to over 100,000 radio stations and more than four million podcasts from every continent. During the recently held Soccer World Cup, over 10.5 million people listened live to the games on radio stations streamed via TuneIn, one of the biggest events in our company’s history.

The State of Machine Data Analytics, pre-Sumo Logic

We had no consolidated strategy to analyze our logs, across our systems and applications alike. As a result and especially because of our rapid growth, troubleshooting and event correlation became manual and increasingly painful affairs that involved looking at individual server and application logs. We tried internal tools including syslog-ng and rsyslog, but the maintenance and overhead costs on a lean IT team were too high.

Why Sumo Logic?

There were a number of reasons why Sumo Logic was appealing to us:

  • As a cloud-based service, Sumo Logic immediately offloaded the maintenance issues we had to deal with running our own home-grown log management infrastructure.
  • With pre-built support for a number of infrastructure components that TuneIn runs on, including AWS, Cisco, VMware, Windows/IIS and Linux, we were confident that we could get insights around our logs far faster than other options.
  • In addition, the Sumo Logic LogReduce technology provided a more robust investigation tool to find root causes of issues that traditional monitoring tools just can’t detect.
  • Finally, Sumo Logic provides a compelling business value for what we are trying to accomplish

Internal Adoption of Sumo Logic

We started with creating basic dashboards and alerts around our key operating system logs. As the application development teams realized the value of what Sumo Logic could provide them, we added additional log sources and launched a series of lunch-and-learns to demonstrate the value of the service. These lunch-and-learns have rapidly broadened the adoption of Sumo Logic across TuneIn. We’re now seeing support teams using it to get customer statistics; different development teams using it to analyze API performance; and the executive team getting overall visibility through real-time dashboards.

Business Benefits

It didn’t take us long to see the benefit of Sumo Logic. Since TuneIn is a distributed PaaS, it was frequently difficult to correspond and troubleshoot issues in a particular API. Time to resolution began to drop from several hours to several minutes as developer and operations staff can search and pinpoint issues. Our development teams were quick to create custom searches and alerts for errors and exceptions in the logs, allowing us to reduce overall error rates by close to 20%. Without Sumo Logic we wouldn’t have even known most of those errors were even occurring. We’re just scratching the surface with Sumo Logic. We’re continue to expand our usage and gain critical insight into API performance, what our most popular user activities are, and where our application bottlenecks are. Sumo Logic isn’t just a log consolidation tool, it also serves as a critical tool in our Business Intelligence toolbox.

Russell

No Magic: Regular Expressions, Part 3

09.11.2014 | Posted by Russell

Evaluating the NFA

In part 1, we parsed the regular expression into an abstract syntax tree. In part 2, we converted that syntax tree into an NFA. Now it’s time evaluate that NFA against a potential string.

NFAs, DFAs and Regular Expressions

Recall from part 2 that there are two types of finite automata: deterministic and non-deterministic. They have one key difference: A non-deterministic finite automata can have multiple paths out of the same node for the same token as well as paths that can be pursued without consuming input. In expressiveness (often referred to as “power”), NFAs, DFAs and regular expressions are all equivalent. This means if you can express a rule or pattern, (eg. strings of even length), with an NFA, you can also express it with a DFA or a regular expression. Lets first consider a regular expressionabc* expressed as a DFA:

regexdfa.png

Evaluating a DFA is straightforward: simply move through the states by consuming the input string. If you finish consuming input in the match state, match, otherwise, don’t. Our state machine, on the other hand, is an NFA. The NFA our code generates for this regular expression is:

dfavsnfa.png

Note that there are multiple unlabeled edges that we can follow without consuming a character. How can we track that efficiently? The answer is surprisingly simple: instead of tracking only one possible state, keep a list of states that the engine is currently in. When you encounter a fork, take both paths (turning one state into two). When a state lacks a valid transition for the current input, remove it from the list.

There are 2 subtleties we have to consider: avoiding infinite loops in the graph and handling no-input-transitions properly. When we are evaluating a given state, we first advance all the states to enumerate all the possible states reachable from our current state if we don’t consume any more input. This is the phase that also requires care to maintain a “visited set” to avoid infinitely looping in our graph. Once we have enumerated those states, we consume the next token of input, either advancing those states or removing them from our set

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54
object NFAEvaluator {
def evaluate(nfa: State, input: String): Boolean =
evaluate(Set(nfa), input)
 
def evaluate(nfas: Set[State], input: String): Boolean = {
input match {
case "" =>
evaluateStates(nfas, None).exists(_ == Match())
case string =>
evaluate(
evaluateStates(nfas, input.headOption),
string.tail
)
}
}
 
def evaluateStates(nfas: Set[State],
input: Option[Char]): Set[State] = {
val visitedStates = mutable.Set[State]()
nfas.flatMap { state =>
evaluateState(state, input, visitedStates)
}
}
 
def evaluateState(currentState: State, input: Option[Char],
visitedStates: mutable.Set[State]): Set[State] = {
 
if (visitedStates contains currentState) {
Set()
} else {
visitedStates.add(currentState)
currentState match {
case placeholder: Placeholder =>
evaluateState(
placeholder.pointingTo,
input,
visitedStates
)
case consume: Consume =>
if (Some(consume.c) == input
|| consume.c == '.') {
Set(consume.out)
} else {
Set()
}
case s: Split =>
evaluateState(s.out1, input, visitedStates) ++
evaluateState(s.out2, input, visitedStates)
case m: Match =>
if (input.isDefined) Set() else Set(Match())
}
}
}
}
view raw regexblog11.scala hosted with ❤ by GitHub

And that's it!

Put a bow on it

We’ve finished all the important code, but the API isn’t as clean as we’d like. Now, we need to create a single-call user interface to call our regular expression engine. We’ll also add the ability to match your pattern anywhere in the string with a bit of syntactic sugar.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
object Regex {
def fullMatch(input: String, pattern: String) = {
val parsed = RegexParser(pattern).getOrElse(
throw new RuntimeException("Failed to parse regex")
)
val nfa = NFA.regexToNFA(parsed)
NFAEvaluator.evaluate(nfa, input)
}
 
def matchAnywhere(input: String, pattern: String) =
fullMatch(input, ".*" + pattern + ".*")
}
view raw regexblog11.scala hosted with ❤ by GitHub

To use it:

1 2 3
Regex.fullMatch("aaaaab", "a*b") // True
Regex.fullMatch("aaaabc", "a*b") // False
Regex.matchAnywhere("abcde", "cde") // True
view raw regexblog12.scala hosted with ❤ by GitHub

That’s all there is to it. A semi-functional regex implementation in just 106 lines. There are a number of things that could be added but I decided they added complexity without enough value:

  1. Character classes
  2. Value extraction
  3. ?
  4. Escape characters
  5. Any many more.

I hope this simple implementation helps you understand what’s going on under the hood! It’s worth mentioning that the performance of this evaluator is heinous. Truly terrible. Perhaps in a future post I’ll look into why and talk about ways to optimize it…

Ozan Unlu

Debugging to Customer Hugging – Becoming an SE

09.10.2014 | Posted by Ozan Unlu

“I know app developers, and that’s not you!” It was a statement that I couldn’t really argue with, and it was coming from one of my closest friends. It didn’t matter that I was employed in a career as an app developer at one of the top software companies in the world. It didn’t matter that I was performing well and the tools and applications I coded were being used by hundreds of internal developers. It didn’t even matter that the friend making the conclusion had never written a single line of code in his life, nor had he any idea of my technical ability. The funny thing was, he meant it as a compliment, and so began the biggest career transition of my life.

Coding and logic puzzles were always very intuitive to me, so I always enjoyed solving a variety of technical challenges. Yet, articulation, interpersonal communication and cross-team collaboration were some of my other strong suits I felt weren’t being used in my professional life. My career ambitions to be the biggest success possible combined with my desire to fulfill my potential always had me wondering if there was a role better suited for me where I would be able to leverage both diverse skills sets. Over the years I had many mentors and through all the various conversations and constructive criticism, the same trend was always prevalent. They all thought I could be more successful within a Program Manager or Technical Lead role as it would allow me to take advantage of these strengths that were being under-used in a purely development-focused role. So I made those career moves, but decided to stay within the company. After all, I didn’t want to cast away the experience and knowledge I had gained during my role there, and believed it would propel me in my new roles as they were in a related field. It did; I continued to be successful, and it was certainly a step in the right direction, but needed to be taken further. I had tunnel vision and when I looked at my career, all my choices seemed a little too safe. It was time to take a risk.

I was informed of the Sales Engineering role as it could be the perfect position for me to stretch my wings and use my full potential. The more I looked into it, the better it seemed. I would be a technical expert with deep knowledge of the product while at the same time selling the value of the solution to potential clients. I would be listening to the customer’s needs and educating them on whether or not our product would be the best fit for them. After spending so much time on research and development teams creating software with the same handful of peers every day, the prospect of working with a mixture of clients who were the top engineering minds in the world across a plethora of different technologies was enticing. Just the ability to work with these industry leaders in a variety of different challenges allowed me to solve more technical problems than I was ever able to do as a developer working on a only a handful of projects over the course of a year. I had warmed up to the idea and it was time to commit to something new.

There is one area of the world that people consistently consider the “Mecca of Tech,” and that is the San Francisco / Silicon Valley Bay Area. That was settled. If I was going to go into sales, I had promised myself I would never sell a product in which I didn’t have full confidence, so I needed to find a company with a product I really believed in. Enter Sumo Logic: a fully cloud based data analytics and machine learning solution.

Curious, I created a free account and played around with the product. In a very short time, I could see the impressive power and versatile functionality, the value it could provide to nearly any tech company. Also growing at a tremendous rate, supported by the top investors and sporting a unique combination of relatively low risk and high upside, I couldn’t craft an argument to deter myself from joining the company. I interviewed, and when offered, accepted the job. After committing, what awaited me next felt like a breath of fresh air.

Joining a start up from a large company and transitioning into the sales field from development, I didn’t know what type of culture to expect. What awaited me was a company culture where team members are genuinely and actively supportive, and it was awesome. In the first couple months I learned more about various technologies in the market than I ever knew existed before. I work with customers and drastically improve their systems, processes and consequently their careers. I did not expect to be able to contribute to our internal product development process yet I have our best engineers coming to ask which direction we should take our features. Being able to work with customers and feel like you’re truly helping them while at the same time continuing to design and engineer a product on the cutting edge is the best of both worlds, and the sizable increase in compensation isn’t a bad side effect either. I have no regrets in making the biggest career transition of my life, I’m happier than I’ve ever been and I’m not looking back.

If you want to join Ozan and work as a Sales Engineer at Sumo, click here!

Russell

No Magic: Regular Expressions, Part 2

09.05.2014 | Posted by Russell

The code for this post, as well as the post itself, are on github.

Converting the Parse Tree to an NFA

In the last post, we transformed the flat string representation of a regular expression to the hierarchical parse tree form. In this post we’ll transform the parse tree to a state machine. The state machine linearizes the regex components into a graph, producing an “a follows b follows c” relationship. The graph representation will make it easier to evaluate against a potential string.

Why make yet another transformation just to match a regex?

It would certainly be possible to translate directly from a string to a state machine. You could even attempt to evaluate the regex directly from the parse tree or the string. Doing this, however, would likely involve significantly more complicated code. By slowly lowering the level of abstraction, we can ensure that the code at each stage is easy to understand and reason about. This is especially important when building something like a regular expression evaluator with literally infinite edge cases.

NFAs, DFAs, and You

We’ll be creating a state machine called an NFA, or nondeterministic finite automata. It has two types of components: states and transitions. When we diagram it, states will be represented as circles and transitions will be arrows. The match state will be a double circle. If a transition is labeled, it means that we must consume that character from the input to make that transition. Transitions can also be unlabeled — that means that we can make the transition without consuming input. Aside: In other literature, you may see this represented as ε. This state machine represents the simple regex “ab”:

ab.dot.png

Our nodes can have multiple valid subsequent states for a given input, as in the following diagram where there are two paths consuming the same input leaving a node:

nfa.dot.png

Contrast this with deterministic finite automata, where, as the name suggests, a given input can only result in one state change. This relaxation in constraints will make evaluating it a bit more tricky, but it makes it much easier to generate them from our tree, as we’ll see shortly. Fundamentally, NFAs and DFAs are equivalent in the state machines they can represent.

Transforming, in Theory

Let’s lay out a strategy for transforming our parse tree info an NFA. While it may seem daunting, we’ll see that by breaking the process into composable pieces, it can be straightforward. Recall the syntax elements that we’ll need to transform:

1. Characters Literals: Lit(c: Char)

2. *Repeat(r: RegexExpr) 

3. +Plus(r: RegexExpr) 

4. Concatenation: Concat(first: RegexExpr, second: RegexExpr) 

5. |Or(a: RegexExpr, b: RegexExpr)

The transformations that follow were initially outlined by Thompson in his 1968 paper. In the transformation diagrams,In will refer the to the entry point of the state machine and Out will refer to the exit. In practice those can be the “Match” state, the “Start” state, or other regex components. The In / Out abstraction allows us to compose and combine state machines, a key insight. For example, if we have a state machine that matches “abc” and another that matches “cde”, connecting them sequentially will yield a state machine that matches “abccde”. We’ll apply this principle more generally to transform from each element in our syntax tree into a composable state machine.

Let’s start with character literals. A character literal is a transition from one state to another that consumes input. Consuming the literal ‘a’ would look like this:

lit.dot.png

Next lets examine concatenation. To concatenate two components of the parse tree, we just need to link them together with a empty arrow. Note that in this example, just as a Concat can contain the concatenation of two arbitrary regular expressions, A and B in the diagram can both be state machines, not just individual states. Something a little bit weird happens if A and B are both literals. How do we connect to arrows together with no intervening states? The answer is that when necessary, literals can have phantom states at each end to make our state machine sound.Concat(A, B) would transform to:

concat.dot.png

To represent Or(A, B) we need to branch from the start state into the two separate states. Once those machines terminate, they must both point to the subsequent (Out) state:

split.dot.png

Lets consider *. Star can be 0 or more repetitions of a pattern. To do that, we want one wire pointing directly to the next state, and one looping back to our current state via AA* would look like:

astar.dot.png

For +, we’ll use a little trick. a+ is just aa*. Generalizing, Plus(A) can be rewritten to Concat(A, Repeat(A)) We’ll rewrite it to that, rather than designing a special pattern for it. I’ve included + in the language for a specific reason: to demonstrate how other, more complicated regular expression elements that I’ve omitted can often be expressed in terms of our language.

Transforming, in practice

Now that we’ve made a theoretical plan, lets dive in to how we’ll actually code it. We’ll be creating a mutable graph to store our tree. While I’d prefer immutability, making immutable graphs is annoyingly difficult, and I’m lazy.

If we were to try to boil the above diagrams into core components, we’d end up with three types of components: arrows that consume input, the match state, and one state splitting into two states. I know this seems a little odd, and potentially incomplete. You’ll have to trust me that this choice leads to the cleanest code. Here are our 3 NFA component classes:

abstract class State

class Consume(val c: Char, val out: State) extends State
class Split(val out1: State, val out2: State) extends State
case class Match() extends State

Aside: I made Match a case class instead of a regular class. Case classes in Scala bring certain sensible defaults to your class. I used it because it gives value based equality. This makes all Match objects equal, a useful property. For the other types of NFA components, we want reference equality.

Our code will recursively traverse our syntax tree, keeping an andThen object as a parameter. andThen is the what we will attach to the free hanging outputs of our expression. This is required because from an aribtrary branch in your syntax tree, you lack the context of what comes next – andThen allows us pass that context down as we recurse. It also gives us an easy way to append the Match state.

When it comes time to handle Repeat we’ll run into a problem. The andThen for Repeat is the split operator itself. To deal with this issue, we’ll introduce a placeholder to let us bind it later. We’ll represent the placeholder with this class:

class Placeholder(var pointingTo: State) extends State

The var in Placeholder means the pointingTo is mutable. It is the isolated bit of mutability allowing us easily create a cyclical graph. All the other members are immutable.

To start things off, andThen is Match() – this means that we’ll create a state machine matching our Regex which can then transfer to the Match state without consuming anymore input. The code is short but dense:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34
object NFA {
def regexToNFA(regex: RegexExpr): State =
regexToNFA(regex, Match())
 
private def regexToNFA(regex: RegexExpr,
andThen: State): State = {
regex match {
case Literal(c) => new Consume(c, andThen)
case Concat(first, second) => {
// Convert first to an NFA. The "out" of that is
// the result of converting second to an NFA.
regexToNFA(first, regexToNFA(second, andThen))
}
case Or(l, r) => new Split(
regexToNFA(l, andThen),
regexToNFA(r, andThen)
)
 
case Repeat(r) =>
val placeholder = new Placeholder(null)
val split = new Split(
// One path goes to the placeholder,
// the other path goes back to r
regexToNFA(r, placeholder),
andThen
)
placeholder.pointingTo = split
placeholder
 
case Plus(r) =>
regexToNFA(Concat(r, Repeat(r)), andThen)
}
}
}
view raw regexblog10.scala hosted with ❤ by GitHub

And we're done! The word to line of code ratio in this post is high -- each line encodes a lot of information, but boils down the the transformations we discussed in the previous section. I should clarify I didn't just sit down and write the code like this -- getting it this short and to the point was the result of several iterations on the data-structures and algorithm. Clean code is hard.

In the debugging process, I wrote a quick script to generate dot files from NFAs so I could look at the NFAs I was actually generating to debug issues. Note that the NFAs this code generates contain lots of unnecessary transitions and states — When writing this, I’ve tried to keep the code as simple as possible, at the cost of performance. Here are some examples for simple regular expressions:

(..)*

evenstrs.dot.png

ab

ab.dot.png

a|b

aorb.dot.png

Now that we have an NFA (the hard part) all we have to do is evaluate it (the easier part). Come back next week for the wrapup post on writing the evaluator, or just read the code for yourself on github.

Caleb Sotelo

How To Add Sumo Logic To A Dockerized App

08.27.2014 | Posted by Caleb Sotelo

This is a guest post from Caleb Sotelo who is a software engineer at OpenX and has been reprinted with his permission.  You can view the original here.  

kuniyoshi_utagawa_the_sumo_wrestler

Sumo Logic is a nifty service that makes it easy watch and analyze your apps’ logs. You install a collector local to the app in question, point it at some files to watch, and your logs are sent to the cloud, where they can be sliced and diced from a nice web UI.

At a high level, Sumo Logic wants to transform big data logs into operational information. But at a practical level, it’s nice not to have to SSH to a production machine and tail or grep enormous files to take your app’s pulse. Not to mention the idea is totally in line with one of the Twelve Factors: treating logs as event streams enables better understanding of an app’s behavior over time.

I’ve had success using SumoLogic at OpenX, so I wanted to give their free tier a shot for a personal project. The only limitations are a 500MB of data per day limit and 7 days of retention. I was surprised not to find anything on the web for installing Sumo Logic alongside a Dockerized app, and I had a couple of Docker-based candidates. So without further ado, here’s how to add Sumo Logic to a Dockerized app:

1. Sign up for Sumo Logic Free

Head over to sumologic.com/signup to sign up. The only catch here is that you’ll need a company email address. For the project I’m going to use SumoLogic for, I own and manage my own domain, so it wasn’t too much trouble to create an email address using my registrar’s mail service. Since I host the domain separately, I did have to add an MX record to my zone file to point to the registrar’s mail server. For example, with DigitalOcean.

2. Download a Collector

Once you confirm your email address and log in, you be stepped through a process for downloading and installing a collector. I chose the Installed Collector and downloaded sumocollector_19.91-2_amd64.deb, becuase my Docker image is based on Ubuntu.

sumo_logic_choose_collector_screenshot

After downloading the collector, the setup wizard proceeds to a screen that spins until it detects a newly installed collector. I didn’t yet know how I was going to install it, and I got logged out of Sumo Logic anyway due to inactivity, so I abandoned the wizard at that point. The Sumo Logic UI changed itself as soon as it detected that my first collector had been installed.

  • As I plan to install the Sumo Logic collector during the docker build process, I uploaded the .deb file to a Dropbox and grabbed the public link to use later.

3. Create Access Keys

When a collector client is installed it has to have some way of authenticating to the Sumo Logic server. The docs for creating a sumo.conf file (we’ll get there soon) offer two choices: (1) provide your Sumo Logic email and password, or (2) provide access keys generated from the UI. The latter is recommended if only to avoid storing a username/password in plaintext. Keys can be generated from ManageCollectorsAccess KeysCreate.

4. Augment your Docker Container

Here’s the Docker-specific part of installing Sumo Logic. We’ll add some lines to our app’s Dockerfile and author two files that are ADDed to the container during a docker build. I assume working knowledge of Docker, but here is the list of Dockerfile commands for good measure.

4.1 Create sumo.conf

First create a sumo.conf file like the following:

name={collector_name}  
accessid={your_access_id}  
accesskey={your_access_key}  

 

where name is an arbitrary name for this collector, and accessid and accesskey are those generated in step 3. There are many more conf options specified here but the important ones, namely sources, can actually be configured through the UI later on.

By convention I put Docker-specific files into .docker/{resource}, so this one goes to .docker/sumo/sumo.conf. It’ll be referenced in our Dockerfile shortly.

4.2 Modify your Dockerfile

Add a block like the following to your Dockerfile (assumed to live in the root of your app’s code), preferably before your actual app is added:

# install sumologic
RUN apt-get -qq update  
RUN apt-get install -y wget  
RUN wget https://www.dropbox.com/path/to/sumocollector_19.91-2_amd64.deb  
RUN dpkg -i sumocollector_19.91-2_amd64.deb  
RUN rm sumocollector_19.91-2_amd64.deb  
ADD .docker/sumo/sumo.conf /etc/sumo.conf  
ADD .docker/sumo/start_sumo /etc/my_init.d/start_sumo  

 

Let’s break this down:

RUN apt-get -qq update  

Update sources. This may not be necessary, but I like to put this before each dependancy installed by my Dockerfile to avoid issues with image caching.

RUN apt-get install -y wget  
RUN wget https://www.dropbox.com/path/to/sumocollector_19.91-2_amd64.deb  

We’ll use wget to grab the collector file we uploaded in step 2. You may opt to ADD the file locally, but this option avoids having to check the resource into your app’s source code, while housing it in a consistent location. Better practice would be to store it in some kind of artifact repository and version it.

RUN dpkg -i sumocollector_19.91-2_amd64.deb  
RUN rm sumocollector_19.91-2_amd64.deb  

Install the debian package and clean up.

ADD .docker/sumo/sumo.conf /etc/sumo.conf  

Copy the newly created sumo.conf file to the place where the collector expects to find it.

Before we get to the last line, let’s pause. If you were able to catch the output from installing the collector, you saw something like:

Preparing to unpack sumocollector_19.91-2_amd64.deb ...
Unpacking sumocollector (1:19.91-2) ...
Setting up sumocollector (1:19.91-2) ...
configuring collector....
configuring collector to run as root
Detected Ubuntu:
Installing the SumoLogic Collector daemon using init.d..
 Adding system startup for /etc/init.d/collector ...
   /etc/rc0.d/K20collector -> ../init.d/collector
   /etc/rc1.d/K20collector -> ../init.d/collector
   /etc/rc6.d/K20collector -> ../init.d/collector
   /etc/rc2.d/S20collector -> ../init.d/collector
   /etc/rc3.d/S20collector -> ../init.d/collector
   /etc/rc4.d/S20collector -> ../init.d/collector
   /etc/rc5.d/S20collector -> ../init.d/collector
Collector has been successfully installed. Please provide account credential in /etc/sumo.conf and start it up via service or init.d script!

 

It was only after sifting through my docker output that I saw this and learned about the existence of a sumo.conf file. Before that, nothing was happening in the Sumo Logic UI because no collector had been correctly installed and started, even when I started the container. Anyway, we got /etc/sumo.conf out of the way, so what about starting it up “via service or init.d script”?

My solution was to include a simple bash script that starts the collector service on startup. But my Dockerfile extends phusion/baseimage-docker, which uses a custom init system. So the last Dockerfile command,

ADD .docker/sumo/start_sumo /etc/my_init.d/start_sumo  

adds a file called start_sumo like:

#!/bin/bash
service collector start  

into /etc/my_init.d. Make sure it’s executable with chmod +x. Like the conf file, this is saved into .docker/sumo/start_sumo of the app code repository.

I am very open to more elegant ways for getting the Sumo Logic collector to start. I’d also like to see how non-baseimage users deal with init requirements. I would have done this as a runit script as recommended by the baseimage-docker README, but the collector script appears to automatically daemonize itself, which breaks runit.

5. Build and Deploy!

I ran docker build and docker run as usual, and voilà!, the newly installed collector popped up in ManageCollectors.

6. Configure Sources

Before we start seeing logs, we have to tell Sumo what a log file is. I clicked ManageCollectorsAddAdd Source and added a Local File entry that had the absolute path to a log file I was interested in. One of the Sumo Logic videos I watched noted that specifying /path/to/log/dir/** will pick up all log files in a directory.

sumo_logic_manage_collectors_screenshot

I waited a couple of minutes, and log messages started coming into the UI. Sweet! Keep in mind that multiple sources can be added for a single collector.


So far, I’ve learned that I can get a bird’s eye view of all my logs from ManageStatus, and look at actual log messages from Search. I haven’t spent time really getting to know the various queries yet, but if they’re worth writing about, expect another post.

Possible Improvement: The above example installs Sumo Logic inside the app container. An alternate approach might have Sumo installed on the host (or in its own Docker container), reading log files from a shared data volume. This has the benefits of (1) requiring only a single Sumo Logic install for potentially more than one app container, and (2) architectural separation of app from log consumption.

That’s it! This turned out to be surprisingly simple. Kudos to Sumo Logic for offering an easy to use service + free tier that’s totally feasible for smallish apps.

Sanjay Sarathy, CMO

Machine Data Analytics, Down Under

08.20.2014 | Posted by Sanjay Sarathy, CMO

Not often have I spent two weeks in August in a “winter” climate, but it was a great opportunity to spend some time with our new team in Australia, visit with prospects, customers and partners, and attend a couple of Amazon Web Service Summits to boot.  

Here are some straight-off-the-plane observations.

A Local “Data Center” Presence Matters:  We now have production instances in Sydney, Dublin and the United States.  In conversations with Australian enterprises and government entities, the fact that we have both a local team and a local production instance went extremely far when determining whether we were a good match for their needs.  This was true whether their use case centered around supporting their security initiatives or enabling their DevOps teams to release applications faster to market.  You can now select where your data resides when you sign up for Sumo Logic Free.

Australia is Ready For the Cloud:  From the smallest startup to extremely large mining companies, everyone was interested in how we could support their cloud initiatives.  The AWS Summits were packed and the conversations we had revolved not just around machine data analytics but what we could do to support their evolving infrastructure strategy.  The fact that we have apps for Amazon S3, Cloudfront, CloudTrail and ELB made the conversations even more productive, and we’ve seen significant interest in our special trial for AWS customers.  

We’re A Natural Fit for Managed Service Providers:  As a multi-tenant service born in the Cloud, we have a slew of advantages for MSP and MSSPs looking to embed proactive analytics into their service offering, as our work with The Herjavec Group and Medidata shows.  We’ve had success with multiple partners in the US and the many discussions we had in Australia indicate that there’s a very interesting partner opportunity there as well.    

Analytics and Time to Insights:  In my conversations with dozens of people at the two summits and in 1-1 meetings, two trends immediately stand out.  While people remain extremely interested in how they can take advantage of real-time dashboards and alerts, one of their bigger concerns typically revolved around how quickly they could get to that point.  ”I don’t have time to do a lot of infrastructure management” was the common refrain and we certainly empathize with that thought.  The second is just a reflection on how we sometimes take for granted our pattern recognition technology, aka, LogReduce.  Having shown this to quite a few people at the booth, the reaction on their faces never gets old especially after they see the order of magnitude by which we reduce the time taken to find something interesting in their machine data.  

At the end of the day, this is a people business.  We have a great team in Australia and look forward to publicizing their many successes over the coming quarters.

photo (6)

Russell

No Magic: Regular Expressions

08.18.2014 | Posted by Russell

The code for this post, as well as the post itself, are on github.

Until recently, regular expressions seemed magical to me. I never understood how you could determine if a string matched a given regular expression. Now I know! Here’s how I implemented a basic regular expression engine in under 200 lines of code.

The Spec

Implementing full regular expressions is rather cumbersome, and worse, doesn’t teach you much. The version we’ll implement is just enough to learn without being tedious. Our regular expression language will support:

  • : Match any character
  • : Match abc or cde
  • : Match one or more of the previous pattern
  • : Match 0 or more of the previous pattern
  •  and  ) for grouping

While this is a small set of options, we’ll still be able to make some cute regexes, like m (t|n| ) | b to match Star Wars subtitles without matching Star Trek ones, or (..)* the set of all even length strings.

The Plan of Attack

We’ll evaluate regular expressions in 3 phases: 1. Parse the regular expression into a syntax tree 2. Convert the syntax tree into a state machine 3. Evaluate the state machine against our string

We’ll use a state machine called an NFA to evaluate regular expressions (more on that later). At a high level, the NFA will represent our regex. As we consume inputs, we’ll move from state to state in the NFA. If we get to a point where we can’t follow an allowed transition, the regular expression doesn’t match the string.

This approach was originally demonstrated by Ken Thompson, one of the original authors of Unix. In his 1968 CACM paper he outlines the implementation of a text editor and includes this as a regular expression evaluator. The only difference is that his article is written 7094 machine code. Things used to be way more hard core.

This algorithm is a simplification of how non-backtracking engines like RE2 evaluate regular expressions in provably linear time. It’s notably different from the regex engines found in Python and Java that use backtracking. When given certain inputs, they’ll run virtually forever on small strings. Ours will run in O(length(input) * length(expression).

My approach roughly follows the strategy Russ Cox outlines in his excellent blog post.

Representing a Regular Expression

Lets step back and think about how to represent a regular expression. Before we can hope to evaluate a regular expression, we need to convert it into a data structure the computer can operate on. While strings have a linear structure, regular expressions have a natural hierarchy.

Lets consider the string abc|(c|(de)). If you were to leave it as a string, you’d have to backtrack and jump around as you tried to keep track of the different sets of parenthesis while evaluating the expression. One solution is converting it to a tree, which a computer can easily traverse. For example, b+a would become:

syntaxex.png

To represent the tree, we’ll want to create a hierarchy of classes. For example, our Or class will need to have two subtrees to represent its two sides. From the spec, there are 4 different regular expression components we’ll need to recognize: +*|, and character literals like .a and b. In addition, we’ll also need to be able to represent when one expression follows another. Here are our classes:

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abstract class RegexExpr
 
// ., a, b
case class Literal(c: Char) extends RegexExpr
 
// a|b
case class Or(expr1: RegexExpr, expr2: RegexExpr) extends RegexExpr
 
// ab -> Concat(a,b); abc -> Concat(a, Concat(b, c))
case class Concat(first: RegexExpr, second: RegexExpr) extends RegexExpr
 
// a*
case class Repeat(expr: RegexExpr) extends RegexExpr
 
// a+
case class Plus(expr: RegexExpr) extends RegexExpr
view raw blog1.scala hosted with ❤ by GitHub

Parsing a Regular Expression

To get from a string to a tree representation, we’ll use conversion process known as “parsing.” I’m not going to talk about building parsers in a high level of detail. Rather, I’ll give just enough to point you in the right direction if you wanted to write your own. Here, I’ll give an overview of how I parsed regular expressions with Scala’s parser combinator library.

Scala’s parser library will let us write a parser by just writing the set of rules that describe our language. It uses a lot of obtuse symbols unfortunately, but I hope you’ll be able to look through the noise to see the gist of what’s happening.

When implementing a parser we need to consider order of operations. Just as “PEMDAS” applies to arithmetic, a different set of rules apply to regular expressions. We can express this more formally with the idea of an operator “binding” to the characters near it. Different operators “bind” with different strengths — as an analogy, * binds more tightly than + in expressions like 5+6*4. In regular expressions, * binds more tightly than |. If we were to represent parsing this as a tree the weakest operators end up on top.

multex.png

It follows that we should parse the weakest operators first, followed by the stronger operators. When parsing, you can imagine it as extracting an operator, adding it to the tree, then recursing on the remaining 2 parts of the string.

In regular expressions the order of binding strength is: 1. Character Literal & parentheses 2. + and * 3. “Concatenation” — a is after b 4. |

Since we have 4 levels of binding strength, we need 4 different types of expressions. We named them (somewhat arbitrarily): litlowExpr (+*), midExpr (concatenation), and highExpr (|). Lets jump into the code. First we’ll make a parser for the most basic level, a single character:

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object RegexParser extends RegexParsers {
def charLit: Parser[RegexExpr] = ("""\w""".r | ".") ^^ {
char => Literal(char.head)
}
view raw regexblog2.scala hosted with ❤ by GitHub

Lets take a moment to explain the syntax. This defines a parser that will build a RegexExpr. The right hand side says: “Find something that matches \w (any word character) or a period. If you do, turn it into a Literal.

Parentheses must be defined at the lowest level of the parser since they are the strongest binding. However, you need to be able to put anything in parentheses. We can accomplish this with the following code:

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def parenExpr: Parser[RegexExpr] = "(" ~> highExpr <~ ")"
def lit: Parser[RegexExpr] = charLit | parenExpr
view raw regexblog3.scala hosted with ❤ by GitHub

Here, we’ll define * and +:

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def repeat: Parser[RegexExpr] = lit <~ "*"
^^ { case l => Repeat(l) }
def plus: Parser[RegexExpr] = lit <~ "+"
^^ { case p => Plus(p) }
def lowExpr: Parser[RegexExpr] = repeat | plus | lit
view raw regexblog4.scala hosted with ❤ by GitHub

Next, we’ll define concatenation, the next level up:

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def concat: Parser[RegexExpr] = rep(lowExpr)
^^ { case list => listToConcat(list)}
def midExpr: Parser[RegexExpr] = concat | lowExpr
view raw regexblog.scala hosted with ❤ by GitHub

Finally, we’ll define or:

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def or: Parser[RegexExpr] = midExpr ~ "|" ~ midExpr
^^ { case l ~ "|" ~ r => Or(l, r)}
view raw regexblog6.scala hosted with ❤ by GitHub

Lastly, we’ll define highExprhighExpr is an or, the weakest binding operator, or if there isn’t an or, a midExpr.

1
def highExpr: Parser[RegexExpr] = or | midExpr
view raw regexblog7.scala hosted with ❤ by GitHub

Finally, a touch of helper code to finish it off:

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def listToConcat(list: List[RegexExpr]): RegexExpr = list match {
case head :: Nil => head
case head :: rest => Concat(head, listToConcat(rest))
}
 
def apply(input: String): Option[RegexExpr] = {
parseAll(highExpr, input) match {
case Success(result, _) => Some(result)
case failure : NoSuccess => None
}
}
}
view raw regexblog8.scala hosted with ❤ by GitHub

That’s it! If you take this Scala code you’ll be able to generate parse trees for any regular expression that meets the spec. The resulting data structures will be trees.

Now that we can convert our regular expressions into syntax trees, we’re well underway to being able to evaluate them. I wrote about the next steps in part 2. As always, the code is on Github.

Garrett Nano

Building Stable Products Through Testing

08.13.2014 | Posted by Garrett Nano

Software systems today contain hundreds of thousands to millions of lines of code written from anywhere between a few developers at a start up to thousands at today’s software giants. Working with large amounts of code with many developers results in overlapping usage and modification of the API’s being used by the developers. With this comes the danger of a small change breaking large amounts of code. This raises the question of how we as developers working on projects of this scale can ensure that the code that we write not only works within the context in which we are working, but also doesn’t cause bugs in other parts of the system. (Getting it to compile always seems to be the easy part!)

Here at Sumo Logic we currently have over 60 developers working on a project with over 700k lines of code1 split up into over 150 different modules2. This means that we have to be mindful of the effects that our changes introduce to a module and the effect that the changed module has on other modules. This gives us two options. First, we can try really really hard to find and closely examine all of the places in the code base that our changes affect to make sure that we didn’t break anything. Second, we can write tests for every new functionality of our code. We prefer the second option, not only because option one sounds painful and error prone, but because option two uses developers’ time more efficiently. Why should we have to waste our time checking all the edge cases by hand every time that we make a change to the project?

For this reason, at Sumo Logic we work by using the methods of test driven development. (For more on this see test driven development.) First we plan out what the end functionality of our changes should be for the system and write both unit and integration tests for our new functionality. Unit tests offer specific tests of edge cases and core functionality of the code change, while integration tests exercise end to end functionality. Since we write the tests before we write the new code, when we first run the updated tests, we will fail them. But, this is actually what we want! Now that we have intentionally written tests that our code will fail without the addition of our new functionality, we know that if we can manage to pass all of our new tests as well as all of the pre-existing tests written by other developers that we have succeeded with our code change. The benefits of test driven development are two-fold. We ensure that our new functionality is working correctly and we maintain the previous functionality. Another instance in which test driven development excels is in refactoring code. When it becomes necessary to refactor our code, we can refactor at ease knowing that the large suites of tests that we wrote during the initial development can tell us if we succeeded in our refactoring. Test driven development calls this red-green-refactor where red means failing tests and green means passing tests. Rejoice, with well-written tests we can write new code and refactor our old code with confidence that our finished work will continue to function without introducing bugs into the system.

Despite all of this testing, it is still possible for bugs to slip through the cracks. To combat these bugs, here at Sumo Logic we have multiple testing environments for our product before it is deemed to be of a high enough standard to be released to our customers. We have four different deployments. Three of them are for testing and one is for production. (For more on this see deployment infrastructure and practices.) Our QA team performs both manual and additional automated testing on these deployments, including web browser automation tests. Since we need a sizable amount of data to test at scale, we route log files from our production deployment into our pre-production environments. This makes us one of our own biggest customers! The idea of this process is that by the time a build passes all of the unit/integration tests and makes it through testing on our three non-production environments, all of the bugs will be squashed allowing us to provide our customers with a stable high performing product.

 

1 ( find ./ -name ‘*.scala’ -print0 | xargs -0 cat ) | wc -l

2 ls -l | wc -l

Johnathan Hodge

PCI – So what?

06.25.2014 | Posted by Johnathan Hodge

As we release the Sumo Logic App for PCI Compliance, I was reflecting on how tough PCI compliance is. It’s obviously an essential part of any organization’s IT strategy that handles credit cardholder information – but it’s tough – monitoring compliance across all the requirements is a big undertaking. And a mistake can have disastrous results.

Because of this, I really like the new guidance I read in v3 of the PCI DSS, released in November 2013, in the new section called “Implementing PCI DSS into Business-as-Usual Processes”. To do this, you need, amongst other things, excellence in monitoring, detection, timely root-cause analysis and well-designed remediation.

Now, the new PCI App from Sumo Logic obviously supports these things. With a broad array of dashboards, reports and searches specifically designed to monitor and detect potential issues across the 12 requirements, hidden within the terabytes of log files that many customers have, our PCI App is strong. But so what? Highlighting there is an issue is close to useless unless you provide the tools to take effective action in diagnosing root cause – making change happen. And as industry experts remind us, no matter what “us vendors” say, there are always false-positives that need to be examined and can get in the way of underlying issues. We’ve all used analysis tools that highlight an issue but then make it nearly impossible to take that critical step to true root cause identification. There’s little more frustrating than hitting that “So what?” moment.

What makes our PCI App exceptional and different is the fact it’s based on the Sumo Logic platform. Once we alert you to a potential failure, it’s simple to identify which Requirement to focus on, and from there to drill into the details. Our unique features, such as Anomaly Detection and LogReduce, make finding the needles in the remaining haystacks painless – and quick.

PCI App

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So what? So, Sumo Logic’s PCI App will not simply highlight potential PCI infractions, it will dramatically reduce the time to root cause analysis – leaving you no time to even consider the “So what?” question. You will be too busy putting new measures in place to prevent the cause of the failure recurring.

Jana Lass

The Internet of Things…and by “Things” we mean Cats! [Infographic]

06.20.2014 | Posted by Jana Lass

The Internet of Things. The popularity of this topic seems to be growing just about as rapidly as as the amount of machine data generated by these “things” has.  A few weeks back, our beloved co-founder and CTO, Christian Beedgen, penned an article, The Internet of Things: More Connectivity Can Mean More Vulnerability, where he discusses some of the security challenges that exist around the exponentially growing number of devices connected to the internet.

Most major tech companies have written about or published infographics about IoT, yet when I read these articles or review infographics, they all seem to be missing a very obvious fact about the Internet…The Internet is made up of cats. To highlight what’s truly representative of our interconnectedness, we present you with an infographic around  ”The Internet of Cats.” Enjoy!

Cat-Infographic-Large

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