Blog › Security Analytics

Eillen Voellinger

Certified, bonafide, on your side

11.05.2014 | Posted by Eillen Voellinger

“How do I build trust with a cloud-based service?”  This is the most common question Sumo Logic is asked, and we’ve got you covered. We built the service so it was not just an effortless choice for enterprise customers but the obvious one and building trust through a secure architecture was one of the first things we took care of.

Sumo Logic is  SOC 2 Type 2 and HIPAA compliant. Sumo Logic also complies with the U.S. – E.U. Safe Harbor framework and will soon be PCI/DSS 3.0 compliant. No other cloud-based log analytics service can say this. For your company, this means you can safely get your logs into Sumo Logic – a service you can trust and a service that will protect your data just like you would.

These are no small accomplishments, and it takes an A-team to get it done. It all came together when we hired Joan Pepin, a phreak and a hacker by admission. Joan is our VP of Security and CISO. She was employee number 11 at Sumo Logic and her proficiency has helped shape our secure service.

Our secure architecture is also a perfect match for our “Customer First” policy and agile development culture. We make sure that we are quickly able to meet customer needs and to fix issues in real-time without compromising our secure software development processes. From network security to secure software development practices, we ensured that our developers are writing secure code in a peer-reviewed and process-driven fashion.

Sumo Logic was built from the ground up to be secure, reliable, fast, and compliant. Joan understands what it means to defend a system, keep tabs on it, watch it function live. Joan worked for the Department of Defense. She can’t actually talk about what she did when she was there, but we can confirm that she was there because the Department of Defense, as she puts it, “thought my real world experience would balance off the Ph.Ds.”

Joan learned the craft from Dr. Who, a member of the (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legion_of_Doom_(hacking)) Legion of Doom. (http://phrack.org/issues/31/5.html#article ) If hacker groups were rock and roll, the Legion of Doom would be Muddy Waters, Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly. They created the idea of a hacker group. They hacked into a number of state 911 systems and stole the documentation on them, distributing it throughout BBS’ in the United States. They were the original famous hacking group. Joan is no Jane-come-lately. She’s got the best resume you can have in this business.

We’re frequently asked about all the security procedures we adopt at Sumo Logic. Security is baked into every component of our service. Other than the various attestations I mentioned earlier, we also encrypt data at rest and in transit. Other security processes that are core to the Sumo Logic service include:

+ Centrally managed, FIPS-140 two-factor authentication devices for operations personnel

+ Biometric access controls

+ Whole-disk encryption

+ Thread-level access controls

+ Whitelisting of individual processes, users, ports and addresses

+ Strong AES-256-CBC encryption

+ Regular penetration tests and vulnerability scans

+ A strong Secure Development Life-Cycle (SDLC)

+ Threat intelligence and managed vulnerability feeds to stay current with the constantly evolving threatscape and security trends

If you’re still curious about the extent to which our teams have gone to keep your data safe, check out our white paper on the topic:
http://www.sumologic.com/_downloads/Sumo_Logic_Whitepaper_Securing_Logic_Service_060313.pdf

We use our own service to capture our logs, which has helped us accomplish our enviable security and compliance accomplishments. We’ve done the legwork so your data is secure and so you can use Sumo Logic to meet your unique security and compliance needs. We have been there done that with the Sumo Logic service and now it’s your turn.

Vera Chen

We are Shellshock Bash Bug Free Here at Sumo Logic, but What about You?

10.01.2014 | Posted by Vera Chen

Be Aware and Be Prepared

I am betting most of you have heard about the recent “Shellshock Bash Bug”.  If not, here is why you should care – this bug has affected users of Bash, which is one of the most popular utilities installed on operating systems today.  Discovered in early September 2014, this extremely severe bug affects bash versions dating back to version 1.13 and has the ability to process shell commands after function definitions in Bash that exposes systems to security threats.  This vulnerability allows remote attackers to execute any shell command and gain access to internal data, publish malicious code, reconfigure environments and exploit systems in infinite ways.

Shellshock Bash Bug Free, Safe and Secure

None of the Sumo Logic service components were impacted due to the innate design of our systems.  However, for those of you out there who might have fallen victim to this bug based on your system architecture, you’ll want to jump in quickly to address potential vulnerabilities. 

What We Can Do for You

If you have been searching around for a tool to expedite the process of identifying potential attacks on your systems, you’re in the right place!  I recommend that you consider Sumo Logic and especially our pattern recognition capability called LogReduce.  Here is how it works – the search feature enables you to search for the well known “() {“ Shellshock indicators while the touch of the LogReduce button effectively returns potential malicious activity for you to consider.  Take for instance a large group of messages that could be a typical series of ping requests, LogReduce separates messages by their distinct signatures making it easier for you to review those that differ from the norm.  You can easily see instances of scans, attempts and real attacks separated into distinct groups.  This feature streamlines your investigation process to uncover abnormalities and potential attacks.  Give it a try and see for yourself how LogReduce can reveal to you a broad range of remote attacker activity from downloads of malicious files to your systems, to internal file dumps for external retrieval, and many others.

Witness it Yourself

Check out this video to see how our service enables you to proactively identify suspicious or malicious activity on your systems: Sumo Logic: Finding Shellshock Vulnerabilities

Give Us a Try

For those of you, who are completely new to our service, you can sign up for a Free 30 day trail here: Sumo Logic Free 30 Day Trial

 

Johnathan Hodge

PCI – So what?

06.25.2014 | Posted by Johnathan Hodge

As we release the Sumo Logic App for PCI Compliance, I was reflecting on how tough PCI compliance is. It’s obviously an essential part of any organization’s IT strategy that handles credit cardholder information – but it’s tough – monitoring compliance across all the requirements is a big undertaking. And a mistake can have disastrous results.

Because of this, I really like the new guidance I read in v3 of the PCI DSS, released in November 2013, in the new section called “Implementing PCI DSS into Business-as-Usual Processes”. To do this, you need, amongst other things, excellence in monitoring, detection, timely root-cause analysis and well-designed remediation.

Now, the new PCI App from Sumo Logic obviously supports these things. With a broad array of dashboards, reports and searches specifically designed to monitor and detect potential issues across the 12 requirements, hidden within the terabytes of log files that many customers have, our PCI App is strong. But so what? Highlighting there is an issue is close to useless unless you provide the tools to take effective action in diagnosing root cause – making change happen. And as industry experts remind us, no matter what “us vendors” say, there are always false-positives that need to be examined and can get in the way of underlying issues. We’ve all used analysis tools that highlight an issue but then make it nearly impossible to take that critical step to true root cause identification. There’s little more frustrating than hitting that “So what?” moment.

What makes our PCI App exceptional and different is the fact it’s based on the Sumo Logic platform. Once we alert you to a potential failure, it’s simple to identify which Requirement to focus on, and from there to drill into the details. Our unique features, such as Anomaly Detection and LogReduce, make finding the needles in the remaining haystacks painless – and quick.

PCI App

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So what? So, Sumo Logic’s PCI App will not simply highlight potential PCI infractions, it will dramatically reduce the time to root cause analysis – leaving you no time to even consider the “So what?” question. You will be too busy putting new measures in place to prevent the cause of the failure recurring.

Bruno Kurtic, Founding Vice President of Product and Strategy

The New Era of Security – yeah, it’s that serious!

02.23.2014 | Posted by Bruno Kurtic, Founding Vice President of Product and Strategy

Security is a tricky thing and it means different things to different people.   It is truly in the eye of the beholder.  There is the checkbox kind, there is the “real” kind, there is the checkbox kind that holds up, and there is the “real” kind that is circumvented, and so on.  Don’t kid yourself: the “absolute” kind does not exist. 

I want to talk about security solutions based on log data.  This is the kind of security that kicks in after the perimeter security (firewalls), intrusion detection (IDS/IPS), vulnerability scanners, and dozens of other security technologies have done their thing.  It ties all of these technologies together, correlates their events, reduces false positives and enables forensic investigation.  Sometimes this technology is called Log Management and/or Security Information and Event Management (SIEM).  I used to build these technologies years ago, but it seems like decades ago. 

SIEM

A typical SIEM product is a hunking appliance, sharp edges, screaming colors – the kind of design that instills confidence and says “Don’t come close, I WILL SHRED YOU! GRRRRRRRRRR”.

Ahhhh, SIEM, makes you feel safe doesn’t it.  It should not.  I proclaim this at the risk at being yet another one of those guys who wants to rag on SIEM, but I built one, and beat many, so I feel I’ve got some ragging rights.  So, what’s wrong with SIEM?  Where does it fall apart?

SIEM does not scale

It is hard enough to capture a terabyte of daily logs (40,000 Events Per Second, 3 Billion Events per Day) and store them.  It is couple of orders of magnitude harder to run correlation in real time and alert when something bad happens.  SIEM tools are extraordinarily difficult to run at scales above 100GB of data per day.  This is because they are designed to scale by adding more CPU, memory, and fast spindles to the same box.  The exponential growth of data over the two decades when those SIEM tools were designed has outpaced the ability to add CPU, memory, and fast spindles into the box.

Result: Data growth outpaces capacity → Data dropped  from collection → Significant data dropped from correlation → Gap in analysis → Serious gap in security

SIEM normalization can’t keep pace

SIEM tools depend on normalization (shoehorning) of all data into one common schema so that you can write queries across all events.  That worked fifteen years ago when sources were few.  These days sources and infrastructure types are expanding like never before.  One enterprise might have multiple vendors and versions of network gear, many versions of operating systems, open source technologies, workloads running in infrastructure as a service (IaaS), and many custom written applications.  Writing normalizers to keep pace with changing log formats is not possible.

Result: Too many data types and versions → Falling behind on adding new sources → Reduced source support → Gaps in analysis → Serious gaps in security

SIEM is rule-only based

This is a tough one.  Rules are useful, even required, but not sufficient.  Rules only catch the thing you express in them, the things you know to look for.   To be secure, you must be ahead of new threats.  A million monkeys writing rules in real-time: not possible.

Result: Your rules are stale → You hire a million monkeys → Monkeys eat all your bananas → You analyze only a subset of relevant events → Serious gap in security

SIEM is too complex

DuckTapeSIEM

It is way too hard to run these things.  I’ve had too many meetings and discussions with my former customers on how to keep the damned things running and too few meetings on how to get value out of the fancy features we provided.  In reality most customers get to use the 20% of features because the rest of the stuff is not reachable.  It is like putting your best tools on the shelf just out of reach.  You can see them, you could do oh so much with them, but you can’t really use them because they are out of reach.

Result: You spend a lot of money → Your team spends a lot of time running SIEM → They don’t succeed on leveraging the cool capabilities → Value is low → Gaps in analysis → Serious gaps in security   

So, what is an honest, forward-looking security professional who does not want to duct tape a solution to do?  What you need is what we just started: Sumo Logic Enterprise Security Analytics.  No, it is not absolute security, it is not checkbox security, but it is a more real security because it:

Scales

Processes terabytes of your data per day in real time. Evaluates rules regardless of data volume and does not restrict what you collect or analyze.  Furthermore, no SIEM style normalization, just add data, a pinch of savvy, a tablespoon of massively parallel compute, and voila.

Result: you add all relevant data → you analyze it all → you get better security 

Simple

It is SaaS, there are no appliances, there are no servers, there is no storage, there is just a browser connected to an elastic cloud.

Result: you don’t have to spend time on running it → you spend time on using it → you get more value → better analysis → better security

Machine Learning

SecurityAnomaliesRules, check.  What about that other unknown stuff?  Answer: machine that learns from data.  It detects patterns without human input.  It then figures out baselines and normal behavior across sources.  In real-time it compares new data to the baseline and notifies you when things are sideways.  Even if “things” are things you’ve NEVER even thought about and NOBODY in the universe has EVER written a single rule to detect.  Sumo Logic detects those too. 

Result: Skynet … nah, benevolent overlord, nah, not yet anyway.   New stuff happens → machines go to work → machines notify you → you provide feedback → machines learn and get smarter → bad things are detected → better security

Read more: Sumo Logic Enterprise Security Analytics

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