Sign up for a live Kubernetes or DevSecOps demo

Click here

Resource Center

Browse our library of ebooks, solutions briefs, research reports, case studies, webinars and more.

All resources

18 of 61 results

Blog

Service Levels––I Want To Buy A Vowel

Video

Illuminate 2019 - Keynote by Ramin Sayar, President & CEO of Sumo Logic

Video

MoneyTree Achieves Compliance and Speeds Innovation with AWS and Sumo Logic

Blog

SnapSecChat: Sumo Logic's CSO Explains the Next-Gen SOC Imperative

Blog

The Insider’s Guide to Sumo Cert Jams

What are Sumo Cert Jams? Sumo Logic Cert Jams are one and two-day training events held in major cities all over the world to help you ramp up your product knowledge, improve your skills and walk away with a certification confirming your product mastery. We started doing Cert Jams about a year ago to help educate our users around the world on what Sumo can really do and give you a chance to network and share use cases with other Sumo Logic users. Not to mention, you get a t-shirt. So far, we’ve had over 4,700 certifications from 2,700+ unique users across 650+ organizations worldwide. And we only launched the Sumo Cert Jam program in April! If you’re still undecided, check out this short video where our very own Mario Sanchez, Director of the Sumo Logic Learn team, shares why you should get the credit and recognition you deserve! Currently there are four certifications for Sumo Logic: Pro User Power User Power Admin Security User And these are offered in a choose-your-own-adventure format. While everyone starts out with the Pro User certification to learn the fundamentals, you can take any of the remaining exams depending on your interest in DevOps (Power User), Security, or Admin. Once you complete Sumo Pro User, you can choose your own path to Certification success. For a more detailed breakdown on the different certification levels, check out our web page, or our Top Reasons to Get Sumo Certified blog. What’s the Value? Often customers ask me in one-on-one situations what is the value of certification, and I tell them that we have seen significant gains in user understanding, operator usage and search performance once we get users certified. Our first Cert Jam in Delhi, India with members from the Bed, Bath and Beyond team showing their certification swag! First, there’s the ability to rise above “Mere Mortals” (those who haven’t been certified) and write better and more complex queries. From parsing to correlation, there’s a significant increase by certified users taking Pro (Level 1), Power User (Level 2), Admin (Level 3) and Security. Certified users are taking advantage of more Sumo Logic features, not only getting more value out of their investment, but also creating more efficient/performant queries. And from a more general perspective, once you know how to write better queries and dashboards, you can create the kind of custom content that you want. When it comes to monitoring and alerting, certified users are more likely to create dashboards and alerts to stay on top of what’s important to their organizations, further benefiting from Sumo Logic as a part of their daily workload. Here we can see that certified users show an increase in the creation of searches, dashboards and alerts, as well as key optimization features such as Field Extraction Rules (FERs), scheduled views and partitions: Join Us If you’re looking to host a Cert Jam at your company, and have classroom space for 50, reach out to our team. We are happy to work with you and see if we can host one in your area. If you’re looking for ways to get certified, or know someone who would benefit, check out our list of upcoming Cert Jams we’re offering. Don’t have Sumo Logic, but want to get started? Sign up for Sumo Logic for free! Our Cert Jam hosted by Tealium in May. Everyone was so enthusiastic to be certified.

Video

Customer Insights: Paf

Blog

Careful Data Science with Scala

This post gives a brief overview of some ideas we presented at the recent Scale By the Bay conference in San Francisco, for more details you can see a video of the talk or take a look at the slides. The Problems of Sensitive Data and Leakage Data science and machine learning have gotten a lot of attention recently, and the ecosystem around these topics is moving fast. One significant trend has been the rise of data science notebooks (including our own here at Sumo Logic): interactive computing environments that allow individuals to rapidly explore, analyze, and prototype against datasets. However, this ease and speed can compound existing risks. Governments, companies, and the general public are increasingly alert to the potential issues around sensitive or personal data (see, for example, GDPR). Data scientists and engineers need to continuously balance the benefits of data-driven features and products against these concerns. Ideally, we’d like a technological assistance that makes it easier for engineers to do the right thing and avoid unintended data processing or revelation. Furthermore, there is also a subtle technical problem known in the data mining community as “leakage”. Kaufman et al won the best paper award at KDD 2011 for Leakage in Data Mining: Formulation, Detection, and Avoidance, which describes how it is possible to (completely by accident) allow your machine learning model to “cheat” because of unintended information leaks in the training data contaminating the results. This can lead machine learning systems which work well on sample datasets but whose performance is significantly degraded in the real world. As this can be a major problem, especially in systems that pull data from disparate sources to make important predictions. Oscar Boykin of Stripe presented an approach to this problem at Scale By the Bay 2017 using functional-reactive feature generation from time-based event streams. Information Flow Control (IFC) for Data Science My talk at Scale By the Bay 2018 discussed how we might use Scala to encode notions of data sensitivity, privacy, or contamination, thereby helping engineers and scientists avoid these problems. The idea is based on programming languages (PL) research by Russo et al, where sensitive data (“x” below) is put in a container data type (the “box” below) which is associated with some security level. Other code can apply transformations or analyses to the data in-place (known as Functor “map” operation in functional programming), but only specially trusted code with an equal or greater security level can “unbox” the data. To encode the levels, Russo et al propose using the Lattice model of secure information flow developed by Dorothy E. Denning. In this model, the security levels form a partially ordered set with the guarantee that any given pair of levels will have a unique greatest lower bound and least upper bound. This allows for a clear and principled mechanism for determining the appropriate level when combining two pieces of information. In the Russo paper and our Scale By the Bay presentation, we use two levels for simplicity: High for sensitive data, and Low for non-sensitive data. To map this research to our problem domain, recall that we want data scientists and engineers to be able to quickly experiment and iterate when working with data. However, when data may be from sensitive sources or be contaminated with prediction target information, we want only certain, specially-audited or reviewed code to be able to directly access or export the results. For example, we may want to lift this restriction only after data has been suitably anonymized or aggregated, perhaps according to some quantitative standard like differential privacy. Another use case might be that we are constructing data pipelines or workflows and we want the code itself to track the provenance and sensitivity of different pieces of data to prevent unintended or inappropriate usage. Note that, unlike much of the research in this area, we are not aiming to prevent truly malicious actors (internal or external) from accessing sensitive data – we simply want to provide automatic support in order to assist engineers in handling data appropriately. Implementation and Beyond Depending on how exactly we want to adapt the ideas from Russo et al, there are a few different ways to implement our secure data wrapper layer in Scala. Here we demonstrate one approach using typeclass instances and implicit scoping (similar to the paper) as well as two versions where we modify the formulation slightly to allow changing the security level as a monadic effect (ie, with flatMap) having last-write-wins (LWW) semantics, and create a new Neutral security level that always “defers” to the other security levels High and Low. Implicit scoping Most similar to the original Russo paper, we can create special “security level” object instances, and require one of them to be in implicit scope when de-classifying data. (Thanks to Sergei Winitzki of Workday who suggested this at the conference!) Value encoding For LWW flatMap, we can encode the levels as values. In this case, the security level is dynamically determined at runtime by the type of the associated level argument, and the de-classify method reveal() returns a type Option[T] where it is None if the level is High. This implementation uses Scala’s pattern-matching functionality. Type encoding For LWW flatMap, we can encode the levels as types. In this case, the compiler itself will statically determine if reveal() calls are valid (ie, against the Low security level type), and simply fail to compile code which accesses sensitive data illegally. This implementation relies on some tricks derived from Stefan Zeiger’s excellent Type-Level Computations in Scala presentation. Data science and machine learning workflows can be complex, and in particular there are often potential problems lurking in the data handling aspects. Existing research in security and PL can be a rich source of tools and ideas to help navigate these challenges, and my goal for the talk was to give people some examples and starting points in this direction. Finally, it must be emphasized that a single software library can in no way replace a thorough organization-wide commitment to responsible data handling. By encoding notions of data sensitivity in software, we can automate some best practices and safeguards, but it will necessarily only be a part of a complete solution. Watch the Full Presentation at Scale by the Bay Learn More

Blog

Why European Users Are Leveraging Machine Data for Security and Customer Experience

To gain a better understanding of the adoption and usage of machine data in Europe, Sumo Logic commissioned 451 Research to survey 250 executives across the UK, Sweden, the Netherlands and Germany, and to compare this data with a previous survey of U.S. respondents that were asked the same questions. The research set out to answer a number of questions, including: Is machine data in fact an important source of fuel in the analytics economy? Do businesses recognize the role machine data can play in driving business intelligence? Are businesses that recognize the power of machine data leaders in their fields? The report, “Using Machine Data Analytics to Gain Advantage in the Analytics Economy, the European Edition,” released at DockerCon Europe in Barcelona this week, reveals that companies in the U.S. are currently more likely to use and understand the value of machine data analytics than their European counterparts, but that Europeans lead the U.S. in using machine data for security use cases. Europeans Trail US in Recognizing Value of Machine Data Analytics Let’s dig deeper into the stats regarding U.S. respondents that stated they were more likely to use and understand the value of machine data analytics. For instance, 36 percent of U.S. respondents have more than 100 users interacting with machine data at least once a week, while in Europe, only 21 percent of respondents have that many users. Likewise, 64 percent of U.S. respondents said that machine data is extremely important to their company’s ability to meet its goals, with 54 percent of European respondents saying the same. When asked if machine data tools are deployed on-premises, only 48 percent of European correspondents responded affirmatively, compared to 74 percent of U.S. respondents. The gap might be explained by idea that U.S. businesses are more likely to have a software-centric mindset. According to the data, 64 percent of U.S. respondents said most of their company had software-centric mindsets, while only 40 percent of European respondents said the same. Software-centric businesses are more likely to recognize that machine data can deliver critical insights, from both an operational and business perspective, as they are more likely to integrate their business intelligence and machine data analytics tools. Software-centric companies are also more likely to say that a wide variety of users, including head of IT, head of security, line-of-business users, product managers and C-level executives recognize the business value of machine data. Europeans Lead US in Using Machine Data for Security At 63 percent, European companies lead the way in recognising the benefit of machine data analytics in security use cases, which is ahead of the U.S. Given strict data privacy regulations in Europe, including the new European Union (EU) General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), it only seems natural that security is a significant driver for machine data tools in the region. Business Insight Recognized by Europeans as Valuable Beyond security, other top use cases cited for machine data in Europe are monitoring (55 percent), troubleshooting (48 percent) and business insight (48 percent). This means Europeans are clearly recognizing the value of machine data analytics beyond the typical security, monitoring and troubleshooting use-cases — they’re using it as a strategic tool to move the business forward. When IT operations teams have better insight into business performance, they are better equipped to prioritize incident response and improve their ability to support business goals. A Wide Array of European Employees in Different Roles Use Machine Data Analytics The data further show that, in addition to IT operations teams, a wide array of employees in other roles commonly use machine data analytics. Security analysts, product managers and data analysts — some of whom may serve lines of business or senior executives — all appeared at the top of the list of the roles using machine data analytics tools. The finding emphasizes that companies recognize the many ways that machine data can drive intelligence across the business. Customer Experience and Product Development Seen as Most Beneficial to Europeans Although security emerged as an important priority for users of machine data, improved customer experience and more efficient product development emerged as the top benefit of machine data analytics tools. Businesses are discovering that the machine analytic tools they use to improve their security posture can also drive value in other areas, including better end-user experiences, more efficient and smarter product development, optimized cloud and infrastructure spending, and improved sales and marketing performance. Barriers Preventing Wider Usage of Machine Data The report also provided insight into the barriers preventing wider usage of machine data analytics. The number one capability that users said was lacking in their existing tools was real-time access to data (37 percent), followed by fast, ad hoc querying (34 percent). Another notable barrier to broader usage is the lack of capabilities to effectively manage different machine data analytics tools. European respondents also stated that the adoption of modern technologies does make it harder to get the data they need for speedy decision-making (47 percent). Whilst moving to microservices and container-based architectures like Docker makes it easier to deploy at scale, it seems it is hard to effectively monitor activities over time without the right approach to logs and metrics in place. In Conclusion Europe is adopting modern tools and technologies at a slower rate than their U.S. counterparts, and fewer companies currently have a ‘software-led’ mindset in place. Software-centric businesses are doing more than their less advanced counterparts to make the most out of the intelligence available to them in machine data analytics tools. However, a desire for more continuous insights derived from machine data is there: the data show is that once European organisations start using machine data analytics to gain visibility into their security operations, they start to see the value for other use cases across operations, development and the business. The combination of customer experience and compliance with security represent strong value for European users of machine data analytics tools. Users want their machine data tools to drive even more insight into the customer experience, which is increasingly important to many businesses, and at the same time help ensure compliance. Additional Resources Download the full 451 Research report for more insights Check out the Sumo Logic DockerCon Europe press release Download the Paf customer case study Read the European GDPR competitive edge blog Sign up for a free trial of Sumo Logic

Blog

SnapSecChat: Sumo Logic CSO Recaps HackerOne's Conference, Security@

Blog

Pokemon Co. International and Sumo Logic's Joint Journey to Build a Modern Day SOC

The world is changing. The way we do business, the way we communicate, and the way we secure the enterprise are all vastly different today than they were 20 years ago. This natural evolution of technology innovation is powered by the cloud, which has not only freed teams from on-premises security infrastructure, but has also provided them with the resources and agility needed to automate mundane tasks. The reality is that we have to automate in the enterprise if we are to remain relevant in an increasingly competitive digital world. Automation and security are a natural pairing, and when we think about the broader cybersecurity skills talent gap, we really should be thinking about how we can replace simple tasks through automation to make way for teams and security practitioners to be more innovative, focused and strategic. A Dynamic Duo That’s why Sumo Logic and our partner, The Pokemon Co. International, are all in on bringing together the tech and security innovations of today and using those tools and techniques to completely redefine how we do security operations, starting with creating a new model for how security operations center (SOC) should be structured and how it should function. So how exactly are we teaming up to build a modern day SOC, and what does it look like in terms of techniques, talent and tooling? We’ll get into that, and more, in this blog post. Three Pillars of the Modern Day SOC Adopt Military InfoSec Techniques The first pillar is all about mindset and adopting a new level of rigor and way of thinking for security. Both the Sumo Logic and Pokemon security teams are built on the backbone of a military technique called the OODA loop, which was originally coined by U.S. Air Force fighter pilot and Pentagon consultant of the late twentieth century, John Boyd. Boyd created the OODA loop to implement a change in military doctrine that focused on an air-to-air combat model. OODA stands for observe, orient, decide and act, and Boyd’s thinking was that if you followed this model and ensured that your OODA loop was faster than that of your adversary’s, then you’d win the conflict. Applying that to today’s modern security operations, all of the decisions made by your security leadership — whether it’s around the people, process or tools you’re using — should be aimed at reducing your OODA loop to a point where, when a situation happens, or when you’re preparing for a situation, you can easily follow the protocol to observe the behavior, orient yourself, make effective and efficient decisions, and then act upon those decisions. Sound familiar? This approach is almost identical to most current incident response and security protocols, because we live in an environment where every six, 12 or 24 months we’re seeing more tactics and techniques changing. That’s why the SOC of the future is going to be dependent on a security team’s ability to break down barriers and abandon older schools of thought for faster decision making models like the OODA loop. This model is also applicable across an organization to encourage teams to be more efficient and collaborative cross-departmentally, and to move faster and with greater confidence in order to achieve mutually beneficial business goals. Build and Maintain an Agile Team But it’s not enough to have the right processes in place. You also need the right people that are collectively and transparently working towards the same shared goal. Historically, security has been full of naysayers, but it’s time to shift our mindset to that of transparency and enablement, where security teams are plugged into other departments and are able to move forward with their programs as quickly and as securely as they can without creating bottlenecks. This dotted line approach is how Pokemon operates and it’s allowed the security team to share information horizontally, which empowers development, operations, finance and other cross-functional teams to also move forward in true DevSecOps spirit. One of the main reasons why this new and modern Sumo Logic security team structure has been successful is because it’s enabled each function — data protection/privacy, SOC, DevSecOps and federal — to work in unison not only with each other, but also cross-departmentally. In addition to knowing how to structure your security team, you also need to know what to look for when recruiting new talent. Here are three tips from Pokemon’s Director of Information Security and Data Protection Officer, John Visneski: Go Against the Grain. Unfortunately there are no purple security unicorns out there. Instead of finding the “ideal” security professional, go against the grain. Find people with the attitude and aptitude to succeed, regardless of direct security experience. The threat environment is changing rapidly, and burnout can happen fast, which is why it’s more important to have someone on in your team with those two qualities.Why? No one can know everything about security and sometimes you have to adapt and throw old rules and mindsets out the window. Prioritize an Operational Mindset. QAs and test engineers are good at automation and finding gaps in seams, very applicable to security. Best Security Engineers didn’t know a think about security before joining Pokemon, but he had a valuable skill set.Find talent pools that know how the sausage is made. Best and brightest security professionals didn’t even start out in security but their value add is that they are problem solvers first, and security pros secondary. Think Transparency. The goal is to get your security team to a point where they’re sharing information at a rapid enough pace and integrating themselves with the rest of the business. This allows for core functions to help solve each other’s problems and share use-cases, and it can only be successful if you create a culture that is open and transparent. The bottom line: Don’t be afraid to think outside of the box when it comes to recruiting talent. It’s more important to build a team based on want, desire and rigor, which is why bringing in folks with military experience has been vital to both Sumo Logic’s and Pokemon’s security strategies. Security skills can be learned. What delivers real value to a company are people that have a desire to be there, a thirst for knowledge and the capability to execute on the job. Build a Modern Day Security Stack Now that you have your process, and your people, you need your third pillar — tools sets. This is the Sumo Logic reference architecture that empowers us to be more secure and agile. You’ll notice that all of these providers are either born in the cloud or are open source. The Sumo Logic platform is at the core of this stack, but its these partnerships and tools that enable us to deliver our cloud-native machine data analytics as a service, and provide SIEM capabilities that easily prioritize and correlate sophisticated security threats in the most flexible way possible for our customers. We want to grow and transform with our own customer’s modern application stacks and cloud architectures as they digitally transform. Pokemon has a very similar approach to their security stack: The driving force behind Pokemon’s modern toolset is the move away from old school customer mentality of presenting a budget and asking for services. The customer-vendor relationship needs to mirror a two way partnership with mutually invested interests and clear benefits on both sides. Three vendors — AWS, CrowdStrike and Sumo Logic — comprise the core base of the Pokemon security platform, and the remainder of the stack is modular in nature. This plug and play model is key as the security and threat environments continue to evolve because it allows for flexibility in swapping in and out new vendors/tools as they come along. As long as the foundation of the platform is strong, the rest of the stack can evolve to match the current needs of the threat landscape. Our Ideal Model May Not Be Yours We’ve given you a peek inside the security kimono, but it’s important to remember that every organization is different, and what works for Pokemon or Sumo Logic may not work for every particular team dynamic. While you can use our respective approaches as a guide to implement your own modern day security operations, the biggest takeaway here is that you find a framework that is appropriate for your organization’s goals and that will help you build success and agility within your security team and across the business. The threat landscape is only going to grow more complex, technologies more advanced and attackers more sophisticated. If you truly want to stay ahead of those trends, then you’ve got to be progressive in how you think about your security stack, teams and operations. Because regardless of whether you’re an on-premises, hybrid or cloud environment, the industry and business are going to leave you no choice but to adopt a modern application stack whether you want to or not. Additional Resources Learn about Sumo Logic's security analytics capabilities in this short video. Hear how Sumo Logic has teamed up with HackerOne to take a DevSecOps approach to bug bounties in this SnapSecChat video. Learn how Pokemon leveraged Sumo Logic to manage its data privacy and GDPR compliance program and improve its security posture.

Blog

Accelerate Security and PCI Compliance Visibility with New Sumo Logic Apps for Palo Alto Networks

Blog

Illuminate Day Two Keynote Top Four Takeaways

Day two of Illuminate, Sumo Logic’s annual user conference, started with a security bang, hearing from our founders, investors, customers and a special guest (keep reading to see who)! If you were unable attend the keynote in person, or watch via the Facebook Livestream, we’ve recapped the highlights below for you. If you are curious about the day one keynote, check out that recap blog post, as well. #1: Dial Tones are Dead, But Reliability Is Forever Two of our founders, Christian Beedgen and Bruno Kurtic, took the stage Thursday morning to kick off the second day keynote talk, and they did not disappoint. Sumo Logic founders Bruno Kurtic (left) and Christian Beedgen (right) kicking off the day two Illuminate keynote Although the presentation was full of cat memes, penguins and friendly banter, they delivered an earnest message: reliability, availability and performance are important to our customers, and are important to us at Sumo Logic. But hiccups happen, it’s inevitable, and that’s why Sumo Logic is committed to constantly monitoring for any hiccups so that we can troubleshoot instantly when they happen. The bottom line: our aspiration at Sumo Logic is to be the dial tone for those times when you absolutely need Sumo Logic to work. And we do that through total transparency. Our entire team has spent time on building a reliable service, built on transparency and constant improvement. It really is that simple. #2: The Platform is the Key to Democratizing Machine Data (and, Penguins) We also announced a number of new platform enhancements, solutions and innovations at Illuminate, all with the goal of improving our customers’ experiences. All of that goodness can be found in a number of places (linked at the end of this article), but what was most exciting to hear from Bruno and Christian on stage was what Sumo Logic is doing to address major macro trends. The first being proliferation of users and access. What we’ve seen from our customers, is that the Sumo Logic platform is brought into a specific group, like the security team, or the development team, and then it spreads like wildfire, until the entire company (or all of the penguins) wants access to the rich data insights. That’s why we’ve taken an API-first approach to everything we do. To keep your workloads running around the globe, we now have 20 availability zones across five regions and we will continue to expand to meet customer needs. The second being cloud scale economics because Moore’s Law is, in fact, real. Data ingest trends are going up, and for years our customers have relied on Sumo Logic to manage mission-critical data in order to keep their modern applications running and secured. Not all data is created equal, and different data sets have different requirements. Sometimes, it can be a challenge to store data outside of the Sumo Logic platform, which is why our customers now will have brand new capabilities for basic and cold storage within Sumo Logic. (Christian can confirm that the basic storage is still secure — by packs of wolves). The third trend is around the unification of modern apps and machine data. While the industry is buzzing about observability, one size does not fit all. To address this challenge, the Sumo Logic team asked, what can we do to deliver on the vision of unification? The answer is in the data. For the first time ever, we will deliver the State of Modern Applications report live, where customers can push their data to dynamic dashboards, and all of this information will be accessible in new easy to read charts that are API-first, templatized and most importantly, unified. Stay tuned for more on the launch of this new site! #3: The State of Security from Greylock, AB InBev and Pokemon One of my favorite highlights of the second day keynote was the security panel, moderated by our very own CSO, George Gerchow, with guests from one of our top investors, Greylock Partners, and two of our customers, Anheuser-Busch InBev (AB InBev) and Pokemon. From left to right: George Gerchow, CSO, Sumo Logic; Sara Guo, partner, Greylock; Khelan Bhatt, global director, security architecture, AB InBev; John Visneski, director infosecurity & DPO, Pokemon Sara Guo, general partner at Greylock, spoke about three constantly changing trends, or waves, she’s tracking in security, and what she looks when her firm is considering an investment: the environment, the business and the attackers. We all know the IT environment is changing drastically, and as it moves away from on-premises protection, it’s not a simple lift and shift process, we have to actually do security differently. Keeping abreast of attacker innovation is also important for enterprises, especially as cybersecurity resources continue to be sparse. We have to be able to scale our products, automate, know where our data lives and come together as a defensive community. When you think of Anheuser-Busch, you most likely think of beer, not digital transformation or cybersecurity. But there’s actually a deep connection, said Khelan Bhatt, global director, security architecture, AB InBev. As the largest beer distributor in the world, Anheuser Busch has 500 different breweries (brands) in all corners of the world, and each one has its own industrial IoT components that are sending data back to massive enterprise data lakes. The bigger these lakes get, the bigger targets they become to attackers. Sumo Logic has played a big part in helping the AB InBev security team digitally transform their operations, and building secure enterprise data lakes to maintain their strong connection to the consumer while keeping that data secure. John Visneski, director of information security and data protection officer (DPO) for the Pokémon Company International had an interesting take on how he and his team approach security. Be a problem solver first, and a security pro second. Although John brought on Sumo Logic to help him fulfill security and General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) requirements, our platform has become a key business intelligence tool at Pokemon. With over 300 million active users, Pokemon collects sensitive personally identifiable information (PII) from children, including names, addresses and some geolocation data. Sumo Logic has been key for helping John and his team deliver on the company’s core values: providing child and customer safety, trust (and uninterrupted fun)! #4: Being a Leader Means Being You, First and Foremost When our very special guest, former CIA Director George Tenet, took the stage, I did not expect to walk away with some inspiring leadership advice. In a fireside chat with our CEO, Ramin Sayar, George talked about how technology has changed the threat landscape, and how nation-state actors are leveraging the pervasiveness of data to get inside our networks and businesses. Data is a powerful tool that can be used for good or bad. At Sumo Logic, we’re in it for the good. George also talked about what it means to be a leader and how to remain steadfast, even in times of uncertainty. Leaders have to lead within the context of who they are as human beings. If they try to adopt a persona of someone else, it destroys their credibility. The key to leaderships is self awareness of who you are, and understanding your limitations so that you can hire smart, talented people to fill those gaps. Leaders don’t create followers, they create other leaders. And that’s a wrap for Sumo Logic’s second annual user conference. Thanks to everyone who attended and supported the event. If we didn’t see you at Illuminate over the last two days, we hope you can join us next year! Additional Resources For data-driven industry insights, check out Sumo Logic’s third annual ‘State of Modern Applications and DevSecOps in the Cloud’ report. You can read about our latest platform innovations in our press release, or check out the cloud SIEM solution and Global Intelligence Service blogs. Check out our recent blog for a recap of the day one Illuminate keynote.

Blog

Introducing Sumo Logic’s New Cloud SIEM Solution for Modern IT

Blog

Black Hat 2018 Buzzwords: What Was Hot in Security This Year?

It’s been a busy security year, with countless twists and turns, mergers, acquisitions and IPOs, and most of that happening in the lead up to one of the biggest security conferences of the year — Black Hat U.S.A. Each year, thousands of hackers, security practitioners, analysts, architects, executives/managers and engineers from varying industries and from all over the country (and world) descend on the desert lands of the Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino in Las Vegas for more than a week of trainings, educational sessions, networking and the good kind of hacking (especially if you stayed behind for DefCon26). Every Black Hat has its own flavor, and this year was no different. So what were some of the “buzzwords” floating around the show floor, sessions and networking areas? The Sumo Logic security team pulled together a list of the hottest, newest, and some old, but good terms that we overheard and observed during our time at Black Hat last week. Read on for more, including a recap of this year’s show trends. And the Buzzword is… APT — Short for advanced persistent threat Metasploit — Provides information about security vulnerabilities and used in pen testing Pen Testing (or Pentesting) — short for penetration testing. Used to discover security vulnerabilities OSINT — Short for open source intelligence technologies XSS — Short for cross site scripting, which is a type of attack commonly launched against web sites to bypass access controls White Hat — security slang for an “ethical” hacker Black Hat — a hacker who violates computer security for little reason beyond maliciousness or personal gain Red Team — Tests the security program (Blue Team) effectiveness by using techniques that hackers would use Blue Team — The defenders against Red Team efforts and real attackers Purple Team — Responsible for ensuring the maximum effectiveness of both the Red and Blue Teams Fuzzing or Fuzz Testing — Automated software that performs invalid, unexpected or random data as inputs to a computer program that is typically looking for structured content, i.e. first name, last name, etc. Blockchain — Widely used by cryptocurrencies to distribute expanding lists of records (blocks), such as transaction data, which are virtually “chained” together by cryptography. Because of their distributed and encrypted nature the blocks are resistant to modification of the data. SOC — Short for security operations center NOC — Short for network operations center Black Hat 2018 Themes There were also some pretty clear themes that bubbled to the top of this year’s show. Let’s dig into them. The Bigger, the Better….Maybe Walking the winding labyrinth that is the Mandalay Bay, you might have overheard conference attendees complaining that this year, Black Hat was bigger than in year’s past, and to accommodate for this, the show was more spread out. The business expo hall was divided between two rooms: a bigger “main” show floor (Shoreline), and a second, smaller overflow room (Oceanside), which featured companies new to the security game, startups or those not ready to spend big bucks on flashy booths. While it may have been a bit confusing or a nuisance for some to switch between halls, the fact that the conference is outgrowing its own space is a good sign that security is an important topic and more organizations are taking a vested interest in it. Cloud is the Name, Security is the Game One of the many themes at this year’s show was definitely all things cloud. Scanning the booths, you would have noticed terms around security in the cloud, how to secure the cloud, and similar messaging. Cloud has been around for a while, but seems to be having a moment in security, especially as new, agile cloud-native security players challenge some of the legacy on-premises vendors and security solutions that don’t scale well in a modern cloud, container or serverless environment. In fact, according to recent Sumo Logic research, 93 percent of responding enterprises face challenges with security tools in the cloud, and 49 percent state that existing legacy tools aren’t effective in the cloud. Roses are Red, Violets are Blue, FUD is Gone, Let’s Converge One of the biggest criticisms of security vendors (sometimes by other security vendors) is all of the language around fear, uncertainty and doubt (FUD). This year, it seems that many vendors have ditched the fearmongering and opted for collaboration instead. Walking the expo halls, there was a lot of language around “togetherness,” “collaboration” and the general positive sentiment that bringing people together to fight malicious actors is more helpful than going at it alone in siloed work streams. Everything was more blue this year. Usually, you see the typical FUD coloring: reds, oranges , yellows and blacks, and while there was still some of that, the conference felt brighter and more uplifting this year with purples, all shades of blues, bright greens, and surprisingly… pinks! There was also a ton of signage around converging development, security and operations teams (DevSecOps or SecOps) and messaging, again, that fosters an “in this together” mentality that creates visibility across functions and departments for deeper collaboration. Many vendors, including Sumo Logic have been focusing on security education, offering and promoting their security training, certification and educational courses to make sure security is a well-understood priority for stakeholders across all lines of the business. Our recent survey findings also validate the appetite for converging workflows, with 54 percent of respondents citing a greater need for cross-team collaboration (DevSecOps) to effectively investigate, prioritize and correlate threats for faster remediation. Three cheers for that! Sugar and Socks and Everything FREE Let’s talk swag. Now this trend is not entirely specific to Black Hat, but it seems each year, the booth swag gets sweeter (literally) with vendors offering doughnut walls, chocolates, popcorn and all sorts of tasty treats to reel people into conversation (and get those badge scans). There’s no shortage of socks either! Our friends at HackerOne were giving out some serious booth swag, and you better believe we weren’t headed home without grabbing some! Side note: Read the latest HackerOne blog or watch the latest SnapSecChat video to learn how our Sumo Logic security team has taken a DevSecOps approach to bug bounties that creates transparency and collaboration between hackers, developers, and external auditors to improve security posture. Sumo swag giveaways were in full swing at our booth, as well. We even raffled off a Vento drone for one lucky Black Hat winner to take home! Parting Thoughts As we part ways with 100 degree temps and step back into our neglected cubicles or offices this week, it’s always good to remember the why. Why do we go to Black Hat, DefCon, BSides, and even RSA? It’s more than socializing and partying, it’s to connect with our community, to learn from each other and to make the world a more secure and bette place for ourselves, and for our customers. And with that, we’ll see you next year! Additional Resources For the latest Sumo Logic cloud security analytics platform updates, features and capabilities, read the latest press release. Want to learn more about Sumo Logic security analytics and threat investigation capabilities? Visit our security solutions page. Interested in attending our user conference next month, Iluminate? Visit the webpage, or check out our latest “Top Five Reasons to Attend” blog for more information. Download and read our 2018 Global Security Trends in the Cloud report or the infographic for more insights on how the security and threat landscape is evolving in today’s modern IT environment of cloud, applications, containers and serverless computing.

Blog

Top Five Reasons to Attend Illuminate18

Last year Sumo Logic launched its first user conference, Illuminate. We hosted more than 300 fellow Sumo Logic users who spent two days getting certified, interacting with peers to share best practices and lots of mingling with Sumo’s technical experts (all while having fun). The result? Super engaged users with a new toolbox to take back to their teams to make the most of their Sumo Logic platform investment, and get the real-time operational and security insights needed to better manage and secure their modern applications and cloud infrastructures. Watch last year’s highlight reel below: This piece of feedback from one attendee sums up the true value of Illuminate: “In 48 hours I already have a roadmap of how to maximize the use of Sumo Logic at my company and got a green light from my boss to move forward.” — Sumo Logic Customer / Illuminate Attendee Power to the People This year’s theme for Illuminate is “Empowering the People Who Power Modern Business” and is expected to attract more than 500 attendees who will participate in a unique interactive experience including over 40 sessions, Ask the Expert bar, partner showcase and Birds of a Feather roundtables. Not enough to convince you to attend? Here are five more reasons: Get Certified – Back by popular demand, our multi-level certification program provides users with the knowledge, skills and competencies to harness the power of machine data analytics and maximize investments in the Sumo Logic platform. Bonus: we have a brand new Sumo Security certification available at Illuminate this year designed to teach users how to increase the velocity and accuracy of threat detection and strengthen overall security posture. Hear What Your Peers are Doing – Get inspired and learn directly from your peers like Major League Baseball, Genesys, USA TODAY NETWORK, Wag, Lending Tree, Samsung SmartThings, Informatica and more about how they implemented Sumo Logic and are using it to increase productivity, revenue, employee satisfaction, deliver the best customer experiences and more. You can read more about the keynote speaker line up in our latest press release. Technical Sessions…Lots of Them – This year we’ve broaden our breakout sessions into multiple tracks including Monitoring and Troubleshooting, Security Analytics, Customer Experience and Dev Talk covering tips, tricks and best practices for using Sumo Logic around topics including Kubernetes, DevSecOps, Metrics, Advanced Analytics, Privacy-by-Design and more. Ask the Experts – Get direct access to expert advice from Sumo Logic’s product and technical teams. Many of these folks will be presenting sessions throughout the event, but we’re also hosting an Ask the Expert bar where you can get all of your questions answered, see demos, get ideas for dashboards and queries, and see the latest Sumo Logic innovations. Explore the Modern App Ecosystem – Sumo Logic has a rich ecosystem of partners and we have a powerful set of joint integrations across the modern application stack to enhance the overall manageability and security for you. Stop by the Partner Pavilion to see how Sumo Logic works with AWS, Carbon Black, CrowdStrike, JFrog, LightStep, MongoDB, Okta, OneLogin, PagerDuty, Relus and more. By now you’re totally ready for the Illuminate experience, right? Check out the full conference agenda here. These two days will give you all of the tools you need (training, best practices, new ideas, peer-to-peer networking, access to Sumo’s technical experts and partners) so you can hit the ground running and maximize the value of the Sumo Logic platform for your organization. Register today, we look forward to seeing you there!

Blog

Get Miles Ahead of Security & Compliance Challenges in the Cloud with Sumo Logic

Blog

SnapSecChat: A DevSecOps Approach to Bug Bounties with Sumo Logic & HackerOne

Regardless of industry or size, all organizations need a solid security and vulnerability management plan. One of the best ways to harden your security posture is through penetration testing and inviting hackers to hit your environment to look for weak spots or holes in security. However, for today’s highly regulated, modern SaaS company, the traditional check-box compliance approach to pen testing is failing them because it’s slowing them down from innovating and scaling. That’s why Sumo Logic Chief Security Officer and his team have partnered with HackerOne to implement a modern bug bounty program that takes a DevSecOps approach. They’ve done this by building a collaborative community for developers, third-party auditors and hackers to interact and share information in an online portal that creates a transparent bug bounty program that uses compliance to strengthen security. By pushing the boundaries and breaking things, it collectively makes us stronger, and it also gives our auditors a peek inside the kimono and more confidence in our overall security posture. It also moves the rigid audit process into the DevSecOps workflow for faster and more effective results. To learn more about Sumo Logic’s modern bug bounty program, the benefits and overall positive impact it’s had on not just the security team, but all lines of the business, including external stakeholders like customers, partners and prospects, watch the latest SnapSecChat video series with Sumo Logic CSO, George Gerchow. And if you want to hear about the results of Sumo Logic’s four bounty challenge sprints, head on over to the HackerOne blog for more. If you enjoyed this video, then be sure to stay tuned for another one coming to a website near you soon! And don’t forget to follow George on Twitter at @GeorgeGerchow, and use the hashtag #SnapSecChat to join the security conversation! Stop by Sumo Logic’s booth (2009) at Black Hat this week Aug 8-9, 2018 at The Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas to chat with our experts and to learn more about our cloud security analytics and threat investigation capabilities. Happy hacking!

Blog

Thoughts from Gartner’s 2018 Security & Risk Management Summit

Featured collections